People living on the water

• People living on the water

We have only to admire the population of Bangladesh as to how these people can best adapt to rising sea level. For them, the terrible future has come.

Residents of villages along the southern coast of Bangladesh must not only cope with one of the highest levels of rainfall in the world; they also live in areas prone to cyclones on soils prone to erosion, which is just a few feet above sea level.

People living on the water

In order to cope with a sudden flood early farmer Abdur Kaddir (in the background) with their employees collect immature jute stems on an island near the Jamuna Kurigrama. Due to the changing climate, the level of seasonal flooding has increased significantly.

People living on the water

While holding the country afloat.

On saline soils of the south, farmers turned the waterlogged rice paddies on land for growing crabs and shrimp.

People living on the water

brick factory workers try to protect the factory from flooding near the river Turaga, near Dhaka.

People living on the water

Attached to the city.

Under a heavy sky of the rainy season, migrants travel by train back to Dhaka after visiting their homes, which are located to the north of the capital. On the other hand paddy fields are sufficiently fertile but spoiled salinity on remote southern areas.

People living on the water

Taxi in the form of boats cross the river Buriganga, leading to Sadar Ghat - the main water gate of Dhaka, which provide a transport link with one of the most densely populated cities in the world. The capital Dhaka, located low enough above sea level, is one of the cities most exposed to the threat of rising sea levels.

People living on the water

The Tipping Point. Dhaka slums, such as bark (background) overcrowded refugees are a huge problem for the city, which suffers from outdated infrastructure, high levels of poverty and constant flooding.

People living on the water

The hot, narrow and crowded streets of Dhaka absorb the crowds of people coming out of the mosque after the celebration of the end of the holy month of Ramadan. One of the fastest growing cities on earth, Dhaka is full of migrants suffering from floods and storms countryside.

People living on the water

Living on an island in the river Jamuna, the fishermen and their families have long been accustomed to floods in their courts. Depending on seasonal work, these people have long been the world's best experts to adapt to any situation in which the life and the changing climate, they can deliver.

People living on the water

High and dry.

In the case of high water on the river, the children from the village of Ali Dzhabed know what to do: climb the bamboo ladder, located in the courtyard and hold tight. Seasonal workers who inhabit an ever-changing islands, located in the floodplains of the three largest rivers of Bangladesh, have long been accustomed to such disasters, the number of which is increasing with each passing year.

People living on the water

native house.

Standing knee-deep in water, Uddin family gathers for dinner. They recently moved their home to the place, trying to escape the flood in Kurigram district of the island. Shortly before this photo was taken, the family was planning to dismantle his house and move again.

People living on the water

In search of the high ground.

The villagers joined forces to try to move house on Siradzhbad, an island on the river Jamuna, where floods are frequent. This mosque, exploded at noon, it has been restored to the evening prayer.

People living on the water

Nothing lasts forever on Siradzhbade - village, which is home to several hundred people, which is on the river Jamuna island, just north of Dhaka. In this photo, volunteers revive the village mosque, which from time to time needs to be transferred, that it has not disappeared under the water.

People living on the water

The mobile clinic on a ship, is supported by a charitable organization called FriendshipBD., Serving hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis living in the islands of the Jamuna River.

People living on the water

The necessary solutions.

A huge number of health workers trained with the support of non-governmental organizations under the name of Bangladesh of BRAC, have helped to reduce child mortality and fertility in general.

People living on the water

afloat 6 days a week, the school-ship, which works on solar batteries, helping to teach children whose homes are flooded periodically.

People living on the water

Lessons for a lifetime.

Children gather in the floating school all year round. Research has shown that educated girls and boys have fewer children than their uneducated peers.

People living on the water

While holding the country afloat.

The inhabitants of the islands in the industrial district of Gaibandha hyacinth plants used to create floating gardens where they grow pumpkins, okra and other industrial crops.

People living on the water

irrepressible spirit.

Children play Dzhaliahali - village which was completely destroyed by the cyclone Aila in 2009. This storm has forced residents to compete for one of several hundreds of cyclone shelters (pictured above), most of which function as centers for communities.

People living on the water