The weather, which changed the course of history

• The weather, which changed the course of history

Weather has always affected the lives of not only the individual, but the entire civilization. Frost forced to surrender to Napoleon and Hitler, the wind scattered deadly armada, and the scorching sun destroyed the food of entire peoples. Here are a few examples of how the most common weather trouble changed the course of our history.

The weather, which changed the course of history

Kamikaze

13th century

Kublai Khan had big plans for the land of the rising sun - I must admit, after the capture of Burma, Korea and Cambodia, he had all the chances to realize them. Japan saved the monsoons, the defeat of the Great Khan's fleet before the ships were able to get close to the shore. Shinto priests called monsoons kamikaze - "divine wind."

The weather, which changed the course of history

Spanish curse

1558

But the Japanese had no monopoly on the whims of nature. In 1558, the wind scattered the Armada of Phillip II, went to conquer a Protestant England. If not raise a storm, our civilization might look different.

The weather, which changed the course of history

Northern War

1709

Charles XII of the first to discover the fashion of the failed war against Russia. His ill-advised plan did not provide for the problems that had to face the soldiers during an unusually long and very cold winter. It should be noted that the same problem was faced, afterwards, and Napoleon Bonaparte, whose naked army lost several million people because of the "General Frost".

The weather, which changed the course of history

The French Revolution

1789

We can say that the French Revolution provoked the most common degrees. Spring drought has put the French peasants in the face of a terrible famine, food grew steadily in price. A sudden hail destroyed crops across the country has led farmers into a frenzy - people were ready even to revolution.

The weather, which changed the course of history

Dunkirk evacuation

1940

300,000 soldiers allied armies were locked by German troops on the Channel coast. On the conclusion of people by sea could be no question - the Luftwaffe in full control of the sky. And then there was that Churchill, later called the "miracle of deliverance": Clouds darkened the skies began hailstorm. Germans had to return the aircraft and Allied soldiers were able to escape from the boiler.